Make your product the star with medical storytelling

The best content tells a story, and medical writing is no different.

Stories make us sit up and take notice, they help us remember, they provide connections between simple facts and spark creativity in our minds. In medical communications, this means going beyond listing product features and data points to give clinicians and healthcare managers a more rounded view.

Think of your drug or medical device as the main character, and all the ways the product can affect hospitals and clinicians as the stories to be told. Storytelling is the key to creating awareness among customers, delivering value to them, positioning you as an expert, and connecting and engaging with current and potential customers. Read on to find out how.COM0043-2015121. Create awareness
There’s a reason oral storytelling survived so long — long enough, in fact, until the printing press was invented, and we could start recording those stories, many of which still survive today (think Grimm’s Fairytales). That’s because, quite simply, the human brain craves stories. In fact, research has demonstrated this time and again — our brains have to work to decode the meaning of data but, when they processing stories, the brain can skip the work of decoding and go straight to the retention of information. Therefore, it’s far easier for potential customers to remember information told by stories than that conveyed as a list of cold, hard facts, however well-organised. What’s more, 92% of consumers say they want to internalise information via stories. Leading consumer brands such as Coca-Cola have successfully adopted this method of marketing, and medical device and drug-makers can, too.

 

2. Deliver value
When you tell a story, you’re not just describing the ‘what’ of your device or drug. That is, it’s not, ‘Once upon a time, after many years of R&D, a product was developed.’ Rather, you’re taking the facts about your device or drug and communicating to hospitals and clinicians why the product matters to them. Author, business consultant and university professor Simon Sinek originated this concept, which he calls the ‘Golden Circle’ as a sales and marketing approach. When you focus on the ‘why’ of your product, your marketing plan must be multi-faceted. Journal articles and conference posters alone won’t cut it. You have to extrapolate that data — doing the work for the customer’s brain — and provide avenues by which to implement the desired change (i.e. buying your product) and convincing reasons for doing so. Therefore, your marketing plan should include health-economic data, clinical decision-making mechanisms (such as pocket guides and apps), downloadable tools for education and cost-efficiency calculations, and more. These kinds of medical communication, though slightly outside the norm, add value for customers while going beyond a list of product features or data to create the whole story of your product.

COM0044-2015123. Position yourself as an expert
Do you want to be ‘just’ a device- or drug-maker, or do you want to be a partner to hospitals and clinicians in the delivery of high-value healthcare? When you focus on storytelling and start creating value-added content for customers, you demonstrate that you share their concerns — and that you’re not just in it to sell, sell, sell. Of course, no one goes into business to not make money, and everyone knows that. But custom storytelling actually helps you make more: it’s ‘92% more effective than traditional advertising at increasing awareness, and 168% more powerful at driving purchase preference.’ That’s because, when customers have a problem, they think first about potential problem-solvers. With a story-telling approach to marketing, that would be you.

4. Connect and engage with customers
Storytelling gives you more space to answer your customers’ questions, and lets you be nimble enough to address new issues in healthcare as they arise. For example, adding a regularly updated blog to your website gives you the flexibility to tell various aspects of your drug’s or device’s story on an ongoing basis. Instead of trying to get all the information into one, long document, you can focus on bite-sized topics — such as how your product helps manage changes in healthcare regulations, enhances patient safety or solves a clinical problem — that customers can digest in a quick read. What’s more, because you’ve positioned yourself as the expert, they’ll become engaged with the content you’re delivering and return for updates. In addition, clinician experiences and patient case studies help you connect with customers, because they’ll see themselves in the content and have a ‘character’ to root for. Clinicians want to know how the products work (clinically, time-wise and economically) for people like them and patients like theirs, and storytelling helps you achieve those aims.

 
Building your strategy
When you consider how to put together all the parts of your drug’s or device’s story, it’s important to take a step back to determine your goals. Sometimes, the perspective of a neutral third-party can help pinpoint your aims — and how to achieve them. Medicalwriters.com can help you craft the components of your product story, delivering storytelling that is straightforward and insightful about your product and industry, that adds a personal touch, and that ensures your audience will want to come back for more.

About Wesley Portegies

Wesley has over 10 years' experience as a marketing manager in the medical industry. He has successfully launched several products in the medical device market and has a great passion for sales and marketing.
1 reply
  1. Peggy Gooday
    Peggy Gooday says:

    As I begin my day as a medical writer for one of the largest medical device companies on the globe, I have a sense of renewal and a perspective I lacked prior to reading this terrific article. I had been blocked on a project, working with extremely dry material about a spine implant, and suddenly it is as if I am seeing things in technicolor! Thank you so much for your article. It really made a difference in the day of this medical writer! Just what the doctor ordered…

    Peggy Gooday, with gratitude…

    Reply

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